Thursday, 23 December 2021

Summer reading


Last week a friend was metaphorically assaulting me for not posting my regular pic of my pile of summer reading. "Fear not!" I played for time, explaining that everything this year takes much longer...



So what are you planning to read over these long summer days of holiday hell?


8 comments:

  1. A Plague Upon Our House - Scott Atlas. I am Justice - Don Watkins. Hitler's American Gamble - Brendan Simms. Deadlines Don't Care If Janet Doesn't Like Her Photo - David Throne. The Cave and The Light - Arthur Herman. Culture & Customs of Ecuador - Michael Handelsman. The Contrarian - Max Chafkin. Risk - C. K. Stead.

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    1. Some good stuff there, Yomper. The Herman v good. Just downloaded the Watkins, which sounds like it will be good. Enjoy!

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  3. Wonderful to see this Peter. All is ok with the world again. :-)

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  4. I always marvel at how many books you you can through in a summer. The only way I could do that would be to lock myself in a room most of the day and not engage with my family. I’m also slowed down by my recent practice of taking hand written notes of key learnings as I progress through a book. It helps me to integrate the key takeaways, but comes at the expense of volume.

    So my ‘pile’ is a lot more modest. ‘The Rational Male - Religion’ (Vol 4) by Rollo Tomassi, and Vol 1 & 2 of ‘History of the English Speaking People’ by Winston Churchill. I’m expecting you won’t be impressed by either.

    I also want to revisit a few key concepts from ‘Objectivism - The Philosophy of Ayn Rand’ by Leonard Peikoff. In particular the criteria for defining objective truth. It has some direct relevance to the content of Rollo’s 4th book, and I’m seeking to integrate what I regard as truth from both sources.

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  5. You read a lot.
    I have only read two books so far - Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson and The Prize by Daniel Yergin

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    1. 'The Prize' is great history! How do you rate the Stevenson?

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    2. Its a easy read. You’ll finish it up in a day or two. Reading the injustice that poor Americans and Black Americas go through with their criminal justice system just enrages me. I had to put it down at times.
      Anyway its a good read for anyone who is still under the belief that the death penalty is sensible and just. I was already opposed to it but was still surprised by many of the stories e.g https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lynching_of_Michael_Donald

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