Tuesday, 16 May 2017

Projects, Day 7: Howick renovation

 

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So some of you have been asking why blogging here has been so light, recently. There’s a simple answer: it’s not just that politics is so dire, it’s that the workload of my current projects has been so heavy.

Among the (too) many projects is this one, another renovation project for a ‘mid-century modern’ in Howick which, like every good renovation project, involves a bit of untangling …

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4 comments:

  1. Assuming north is at the top of the sketch, why are the afternoon areas on the eastern side of the building, thereby avoiding the afternoon sun to the W-NW? Perhaps in Auckland (like Australia) the afternoon sun is something to generally be avoided; in contrast to the South Island where it's something you want, particularly when having an afternoon drink after being stuck in the office all day.

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    Replies
    1. Fear not, Mark. In the sketch above, we are looking nearly due south.

      Afternoon sun *is* welcome in Auckland homes, though it does need some shading in summer -- and never in our kitchens!

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    2. Ah, I see now your question was about the diagram. The thing is, the house already has a pool and large outdoor area slightly uphill and out to the east (uphill enough that it gets all-day sun), but it's tortuously difficult to get out there. So the renovation will open up a path to it right through the centre of the house -- which will now be a sunlit centre.

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  2. Richard McGrath22 May 2017, 17:54:00

    Changing subject slightly - the Resene Architecture & Design Film Festival is on in the main centres - I watched the Neutra double feature in Wellington last night. There's also one on Eero Saarinen, designer of the TWA terminal and St Louis arch.

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