Thursday, 26 March 2015

Economics for Real People: “What’s Wrong with Innovation Policy in New Zealand?”

I know you were wondering about tonight’s session at the Auckland Uni Economics Group…

This week we are delighted to be joined by Professor Tony Endres, who will address the question “What’s Wrong with Innovation Policy in New Zealand?”

Tony will apply the ideas of Joseph Schumpeter, Friedrich Hayek, Edmund Phelps and William Baumol to selected aspects of innovation policy in New Zealand, offering a critique of the main developments in NZ government innovation policy in recent years, especially the movement to target new-to-the-world type innovations at the expense of incremental innovation.

He explains that the best government can do is provide a stable intellectual property and tax environment that will foster innovation by creatively intelligent people in the private sector, people who take risks with their own resources.

This discussion is derived from a more comprehensive treatment of innovation issues that was presented with a NYU colleague, Professor David Harper, at a conference on the "The Ends of Capitalism" sponsored by The Classical Liberal Institute, NYU Law School in Feb 2015.
http://www.classicalliberalinstitute.org/the-ends-of-capitalism/

        Date: Tonight, Thursday, March 26
        Time: 6-7pm
        Location: Case Room 1, Level Zero, University of Auckland Business School
                                (plenty of parking in the Business School basement, entrance off Grafton Rd)

PS: Keep up to date with us on our 2015 Facebook page.

1 comment:

  1. What a fantastic blog I have ever seen. I didn’t find this kind of information till now. Thank you so much for sharing this information.
    Herbal Potpourri

    ReplyDelete

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