Wednesday, 21 May 2014

Lou Vincent: a Sorry, Pathetic Excuse For a Man [updated]

Former cricketer and self-admitted match fiddler Lou Vincent is alleged to have received several hundred thousand dollars in ill-gotten cash over the years he betrayed his team-mates and teams’ fans, feeling no compunction about the betrayal  because, he says, Cricket NZ had treated him badly over the years.

Poor lamb.

For this he sold out everything he purported to stand for, and whatever integrity he once might have had.

The way he was treated is nothing compared to the way he treated his employers, and those who love and follow his sport. To those he put two fingers up and reached with both hands for the money.

And all for what?

A nice car? A nice house? Some decent holidays? 

But how can you ever truly enjoy any of that?

How can you? If you have any shred of decency at all, you can’t look yourself in the mirror. And if all decency has disappeared, then you’re incapable of any real enjoyment.

And what friend, or life partner, would truly want to enjoy your company? When ostracism from anyone with any decency is deserved; association only with scoundrels your only future.

What benefit is it, you might ask yourself, to gain all the material possessions the world can give, but in the process lose your soul?

This sorry, pathetic excuse for a man is now beginning to find out.

Lou Vincent has in recent times “opened up” about “battling depression.”  I’d suggest he brought at least some of that upon himself, and there are few who might deserve it more.

He now says

I fully accept I need to be punished but it would mean the world to me to have the opportunity to give something back to cricket, the sport I love, when my punishment is served.

Fuck him. He already has exactly what he deserves: ignominy.

A life ban should be the only thing he ever now receives from the sport he “loves.”

UPDATE: Former England captain Michael Vaughan:

Vincent has confessed and, by becoming a whistleblower, has at least provided a small positive to a negative story. But I do not congratulate him or want to see him made out to be a hero.
    He took money from fixers so he is a disgrace. He has thrown away everything. I played quite a lot of cricket against Louie. I always thought he was a talented player. He was a great strokemaker who had a brilliant reverse sweep he struck hard at a time when that kind of thing was quite unusual in the game. He was an excellent, athletic fielder and had a huge amount of talent. It was nonsense for him to think the game was not good to him. He was an international cricketer playing for his country, an overseas player in county cricket with a good career and a nice living that many people would envy.
    He was obviously susceptible to being manipulated and that is something you could never guess from playing against him. It makes you wonder how many more players are harbouring dark secrets.
    I have always said the best deterrent is a life ban. Anyone convicted of being involved in match-fixing should be kicked out of the sport for good.

7 comments:

  1. Yup, life ban. Zero tolerance for this sort of thing. That he carried it on for some years rubs out any interest in hearing his explanations. Just pitiable & sad.



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  2. A life ban is going to make fuck all difference at this point, Jail, may serve as a greater deterrent to others.

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  3. Craig, the sport can't jail him. Only the govt can, and should -- since he's clearly committed fraud.

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  4. Please explain where is the fraud. I mean by this question where is the breaking of law. Which law did he break? It is interesting to know. Are the Police going to go after him?

    Amit

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  5. Amit - the games were fixed by this degenerate and his friends.

    Like many people, I enjoy betting on sporting contests - Carlton in the AFL, Arsenal in English soccer, the All Blacks, Oracle in the America's Cup (haha!), title fight Boxing matches, and the Black Caps.

    Like many people, I am happy to "pay your money and take your chances" (and not be a cry baby if I lose); this is the nature of gambling.

    Putting $5 on your favourite team makes it much more interesting and fun to watch.

    Usually I use the TAB but have from time to time made use of the services of a couple of bookies in Sydney I know - (despite their activities not being entirely legal) - if the odds being offered are better.

    Now, I am happy to make bets, prepared to lose, happy when I win (and always do when Carlton is playing Geelong, for instance HAHA!!), but like everybody else want to make bets on a level playing field and it pisses me off to find out certain games were RIGGED.

    Mr Vincent has cost a lot of people a great deal of money.

    The word going around is it appears certain Indian chappies - the "cognoscenti" - were placing large bets on the other side of the World in Sydney on games they knew were rigged, and making fools of certain "Colourful Sydney Identities", as the media describes them.

    All highly amusing (and couldn't happen to nice people haha!) but as a word to the wise Mr Vincent should stay well clear of Sydneytown; the Police are the least of his worries.

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  6. Mr Lineberry

    Did he break the law?

    Amit

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  7. As I understand it - no.

    When all boiled down, Mr Vincent has made a large amount of money on rigged cricket games; if that wasn't bad enough he now starts to pimp on his friends to save himself - he is a dog; nothing more than a dog.

    In my opinion he deserves a massive wheelchair-for-the-rest-of-his-life kicking (something to be really depressed about) as a warning to others as to what happens when you treat punters like c--ts.

    (but what do I know?)

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