Tuesday, 17 December 2013

Why Len Brown should stay on

The popular argument against Len Brown staying on as Mayor amounts to saying that he has lost the respect of so many people, he is now unable to do his job.

On the second point at least, I don’t entirely disagree with that. I only wish that it were  true.

Because from my point of view, given that Len Brown sees his job as pushing Aucklanders around and building multi-billion-dollar monuments, I do not want Len Brown doing his job.

Or any mayor, for that matter, with that as their ambition. So offer me a lame-duck, disrespected, abjectly ineffective occupant of the mayoral office, and I’m going to take your arm off.

So on that score, if the popular argument is right and it costs another $100,000 to keep Len disrespected, that seems like money well spent.


  1. I think Len has lost more than respect.

    Since he's been found to be cheating in his private life, it's likely that he's been cheating professionally as well. There is already circumstantial evidence of this.

    As to the argument that he should stay on, it effectively says that his actions are acceptable. That isn't something to be proud of

    If you leave him in his present position, it's likely that he will spend the rest of his term spending in a reckless manner with no regard for the long term future.

    I presume a change of mayor would be a change of direction for Auckland (We couldn't get a worse one than what we have at present could we?)

    B Whitehead

  2. A very good article post indeed and thanks for sharing. It has proven useful to me as I am a construction student currently studying at university. I feel that your post was fluid and describes the topic very well. Regards, Steve
    Construction Dissertations | Building Studies Dissertations


1. Commenters are welcome and invited.
2. All comments are moderated. Off-topic grandstanding, spam, and gibberish will be ignored. Tu quoque will be moderated.
3. Read the post before you comment. Challenge facts, but don't simply ignore them.
4. Use a name. If it's important enough to say, it's important enough to put a name to.
5. Above all: Act with honour. Say what you mean, and mean what you say.