Thursday, 1 August 2013

ECONOMICS FOR REAL PEOPLE: Something happened in England. Why? [updated]

Here’s the news on tonight’s meeting from our friends at the Auckland Uni Economics Group:

Three-hundred years ago, something unprecedented happened in Britain.

For thousands of years of human history, production had barely if ever risen above subsistence levels. Then all of a sudden, in late-eighteenth century Britain, production and prosperity took off--and population with it.

Why?

This is the question we’ll look at tonight—the answer to which has enormous implications for why some places are rich, while others just suck. Along the way we’ll discuss some other related questions which you might like to ponder as well:

  • Why do people in shanty towns build their furniture before their roofs?
  • Why do some places produce factories and enormous wealth, while in others all they have are pushcarts and penury?
  • How did problems with goats and chickens seven-hundred years ago lead to an enormous humanitarian advance we still enjoy?
  • And why might your neighbour want to invoice you for his new flower bed?

Join us tomorrow night to discuss the answers to these questions and much more--and find out what they all have to do with our subject: property rights.

   Date: Tonight, Thursday, August 1
  Time: 6pm
  Where: Room 215, Level 2, Business School Building (OGGB)

See you there!
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UPDATE:

UPDATE: Supporting information for the lecture:

1 comment:

  1. The only way to increase real per capita income is to increase your level of technology. The key to the Industrial Revolution was private property rights for inventions - new technology

    ReplyDelete

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